Russia’s Glonass-M satellite put into orbit

Russia sent another Glonass-M navigation satellite into orbit on Monday, said Alexei Zolotukhin, spokesman of Russian Space Forces.

The Soyuz carrier rocket with the satellite on board was launched from the Plesetsk space center earlier in the day.

Mission control specialists have been holding a steady connection with the satellite, Zolotukhin said. The satellite’s onboard systems are operating normally.

The Glonass-M will augment a group of 30 Glonass satellites already in orbit. This was the last launch of a Glonass satellite this year.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian uses. Both systems allow users to determine their positions to within a few meters.

Russia’s Glonass system currently has 23 operational satellites, while a total of 24 is needed to provide global coverage.

On November 4, three reserve Glonass-M satellites were launched from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan after three Glonass-Ms were destroyed in a failed launch last year.

Russia launches last Glonass-M satellite of 2011

A Russian Soyuz carrier rocket with a Glonass-M navigation satellite on board was launched from the Plesetsk space center on Monday, Russian Space Forces spokesman Alexei Zolotukhin said.

The launch of the Glonass, which will augment a group of 27 similar satellites already in orbit, took place on schedule at 12:25 Moscow time (08:25 GMT), Zolotukhin said.

This is the fifth and the last launch of a Glonass satellite this year.

On November 4, three reserve Glonass-M satellites were launched from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan after three Glonass-Ms were destroyed in a failed launch last year.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian uses. Both systems allow users to determine their positions to within a few meters.

A Glonass satellite launched on October 3 completed the grouping of 24 functioning satellites needed to provide global coverage.

 

Smartphones get boost from Russian satellites

The rapidly developing GLONASS technology, the Russian alternative to GPS, will soon allow smartphone users to take a peek at a map anytime they want to.

Aleksandr Gurko, Head of the GLONASS distribution company, says he expects to have agreements with most smartphones producers such as ZTE, Huawei and HTC and to extend existing deals with Nokia, Apple and Motorola.

But that’s not the only use of the navigation system – it’s actively used by emergency services, the police, oil and gas companies. Gurko says his company will cooperate with other firms, such as Finnish retailer Stockman, to build logistic transport centers. Another use of the technology is monitoring heavy trucks so as to make them pay a toll for damaging road surfaces. This system of truck-tolls is currently in use and Germany and will be introduced in Russia. 

The company has seen a tenfold growth rate this year, and has been expanding into India, Belarus and Ukraine.

GLONASS, an acronym for “Global Navigation Systems”, was originally conceived during the Soviet era and its satellites were launched into orbit in the 1980s. However, during the 1990s, when financing was drastically reduced, the system dilapidated and was only revived during the presidency of Vladimir Putin. It was fully recompleted last month with the launch of the 24th satellite. Cars made in Russia started deploying the system in 2007.

Nokia to be first to use Russia’s Glonass navigation system in its phones

Finland’s Nokia, the world’s largest mobile phone producer, is to be the first international manufacturer to use Russia’s satellite navigation system, Glonass, in its phones and software platforms, national navigation services provider NIS Glonass said on Friday.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian use. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov has said that the government might impose import customs duties for foreign products with GPS navigation systems without Glonass support from 2012.

Under a memorandum of mutual understanding signed by the two companies, Nokia plans to adapt the Russian system to the company’s products not only for the Russian market but also for international markets.

“Signing the memorandum with Nokia provides conditions for the mass introduction of Glonass technologies in Russian and foreign consumer markets. We will develop and maintain Glonass services for car and mobile phone owners together with Nokia,” NIS Glonass General Director Alexander Gurko was quoted in the company’s statement as saying.

U.S. Apple and South Korea’s Samsung, key mobile market giants, have said that their newest touch-screen smartphones, Apple iPhone 4S and Samsung Galaxy Note, would have Glonass support.

 

Russia launches Glonass satellites

Russia on Friday launched a Proton-M rocket carrying three Glonass navigation satellites from the Baikonur space center after a 24-hour delay due to technical reasons, a spokesman for the Federal Space Agency Roscosmos said.

This was first launch of a Proton-M rocket with Glonass satellites from Baikonur since the failed launch last year which destroyed three Glonass-Ms.

The launch was conducted at 16:51 Moscow time [12:51 GMT] on Friday. “The separation of the satellites is expected at 22:41 Moscow time [18:41 GMT],” the official said.

The launch was postponed for a day on Thursday after a malfunction of the switching network was detected during a check of the ground-based equipment at the launch pad.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian uses. Both systems allow users to determine their positions to within a few meters.

Russia currently has a total of 27 Glonass satellites in orbit, although only 23 of them are operational.

According to Roscosmos, two Glonass satellites are under maintenance, one is on a standby, and one recently launched satellite is being integrated into the grouping.

The complete Glonass grouping needs 24 functioning and 2-3 reserve satellites to operate with global coverage.

Russia set to launch Proton-M carrier rocket with 3 Glonass-M satellites

Russia’s Proton-M carrier rocket with three Glonass-M navigation satellites will be launched on Thursday from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan, a spokesman for the Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos) said.

“The launch is scheduled for 16:55 Moscow time [12:55 GMT]. The separation of the satellites is slated for 22:45 Moscow time [18:45 GMT],” the spokesman said.

By the end of the month Russia plans to put another Glonass-M satellite into orbit. It will be delivered by a Soyuz 2.1b launch vehicle from Russia’s Plesetsk space center.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian uses. Both systems allow users to determine their positions to within a few meters.

Russia currently has a total of 28 Glonass satellites in orbit, although only 20 of them are operational.

According to the Russian Federal Space Agency, five Glonass satellites are under maintenance, one is on a standby, and two recently launched satellites are being integrated into the grouping.

The complete Glonass grouping needs 24 functioning and 2-3 reserve satellites to operate with global coverage.

 

Chukotka whalers get new boats, satellite navigation from government

Whalers from Russia’s Far East have received new boats and Glonass satellite navigation equipment under a state support program for native peoples, a regional administration spokesman said.

The move is an expansion of the broader state initiative to introduce in Russia Glonass, a satellite navigation system rivaling the U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS). In a move to edge out the U.S. rival, Russian authorities want Glonass sets be installed in all public transportation and have recently increased import tariffs on GPS devices including iPads.


“The Levadia steamboat brought a large batch of equipment for marine hunters of two Chukotka districts, the traditional centers of marine mammal hunting,” a spokesman for the agricultural department of the Chukotka Autonomous District’s administration said.

Hunters received eight large motor boats, rescue equipment, Glonass satellite navigation vessel-tracking systems and fuel. Another delivery is expected in late November.

Hunting grey whales has been banned in Russia since 1947. Russia’s northeasternmost Chukotka Peninsula is the only region in Russia where whaling is permitted to encourage traditional activities and preserve the ethnic identity and cultural heritage of the region’s indigenous peoples.

So far eight communities, employing about 320 people, are hunting whales and other marine mammals in the region. This year hunters killed 117 whales and 2,906 walruses and seals.

Their activities are supported by the four-year state program with a total budget of 378.2 million rubles ($12.3 million) allocated from the federal and district budgets. The deliveries under the program began in 2010.

Apart from receiving subsidies from the state, native whalers are provided with fuel and various types of equipment, including boats and off-road vehicles. The state also gives them equipment for communications, rescue and navigation.

GLONASS’s immense budget to crack American GPS

Russia is to spend $11 billion on its brand new GLONASS navigation system, hoping to make it as good as American rival GPS.

The plan is to cover the whole planet with GLONASS, which requires more satellites to be launched. This year alone, seven of them are scheduled to reach the Earth’s orbit.

The developers also hope to narrow the satellite’s precision from two meters to seventy-eighty centimeters.

“Currently, GPS is a bit better,” Vitaly Poltoratsky, head of System Solutions Department at M2M Telematics, told RT. “The development of the GLONASS satellite group and more sophisticated devices on the ground will enable the system to be fully competitive by 2015.”

Despite optimistic forecasts, GLONASS system has encountered numerous problems since it was launched. In December 2010, three satellites did not manage to reach orbit, which cost the Russian Space Agency billions in damages and the head of the agency his position.

The increased cash injection is expected to help the specialists prevent such episodes.

The GLONASS program was launched in the mid-1970s and was fully operational in 1995, just two years behind the American GPS. However, by 2001 there were only six satellites left from the minimum 24 that are necessary, and while GPS receivers were used in air carriers to civilian airliners to every car and smart phone, GLONASS was trying to fund a replacement.

Since then, Russia has developed the second generation of satellites for the system named GLONASS-M.

Compared to the outdated version, it lasts much longer (seven years against three, which explains how the system degraded so fast in the first place), is 40 per cent more powerful and allows for better accuracy. The first prototypes of the GLONASS-M were tested in space in 2003, while the first “true” second-generation satellite was launched in 2005.

At the moment, Russia is testing an even better version, GLONASS-K, with the first satellite already in orbit. The third generation is being developed to be compatible with GPS and the future European Galileo navigation.

Navigation satellite Glonass-M sent into orbit

Navigation satellite Glonass-M sent into orbit

Published: 03 October, 2011, 03:57
Edited: 03 October, 2011, 10:24

(RIA Novosti / Andrey Morgunov)

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The booster Soyuz-2.1b, carrying a Global Navigation Satellite System (Glonass) satellite, was successfully launched from the Plesetsk spaceport and put into orbit. Space Troop teams monitored the launch through the ground automated control system.

“The launch of the booster and the orbiting of the satellite passed as scheduled,” a spokesman for the Russian Space Troops, Aleksey Zolotukhin, told Itar Tass on Monday. “The satellite Glonass-M was put under control at 3:55 a.m. Moscow time.”

The satellite weighs 1,415 kilograms and is expected to serve for seven years.

More Glonass launches are scheduled for this year. A Proton-M rocket with a Briz-M booster will launch a Glonass-M trio from Baikonur on November 4, while a Soyuz-2-1B rocket with a Fregat booster will bring another Glonass-M into orbit from Plesetsk on November 22.

The Glonass satellite constellation consists of 24 space vehicles, evenly distributed in three orbital planes. Satellites operate in circular orbits at altitudes of 19,100 kilometers. This configuration permits uninterrupted global coverage of the Earth’s surface and terrestrial space by the navigation field.

Data from NIS Glonass

The Global navigation satellite system Glonass is intended for determining location, speed and exact time by military and civilian users.

The system will provide continuous year-round global navigation support globally regardless of weather conditions. The system is available to a vast number of users on the Earth’s surface and at elevations of up to 2,000 kilometers.

The first Glonass test flight took place in October 1982, and by 1993 the Glonass system was brought into operational testing. In 1995 the full orbit group of 24 satellites was formed. However, a reduction in funding in 1990 for Russia’s space industry led to a deterioration of the Glonass project.

In 2002, the Russian government approved a number of policy documents, including the “Global Navigation System” federal program, which brought new life and funding to the navigation system.

According to Russia’s Federal Space Agency, the main difference between Glonass and GPS is the signal and its structure. The GPS system uses code-division channeling. Glonass uses frequency-division channeling. Also, Glonass satellites’ motion is described as using fundamentally different mathematical models.

While Glonass consists of 24 satellites, GPS can be fully functional with 24 satellites but is currently using 31 of them.

02.10, 23:10

3 comments

Today: 06:52



Nay Lin Maung
October 03, 2011, 04:20

Do we see space war in the Sky or not?

 

 

 

Glonass-M satellite launch postponed until Sunday

The launch of the Soyuz-2.1B carrier rocket with the Glonass-M navigation satellite was postponed until Sunday because of the approaching cyclone, Russia’s Space Forces spokesman Colonel Alexei Zolotukhin said on Saturday.

The launch from the Plesetsk Space Center in northern Russia was scheduled for Saturday, but it has been postponed since the wind force exceeds the characteristics, allowed at the altitude of 7-10 kilometers, Zolotukhin said.

The Space Forces commander, Gen. Oleg Ostapenko dismissed any technical mishaps of the Soyuz carrier rocket.

“All the technical checks were held without flaws,” Ostapenko added.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian uses. Both systems allow users to determine their positions to within a few meters.

The Russian aerospace industry has faced a series of misfortunes over the last nine months, including the loss of three Glonass satellites, a prized Express-AM4 satellite and the fall of the Progress M-12M cargo in south Siberia’s Altai Republic.

The loss of Glonass satellites alone cost the state 4.3 billion rubles ($152.2 million).

Russia set to launch Glonass-M satellite on Oct. 1

A Russian Soyuz-2.1B carrier rocket has been scheduled to lift off on October 1 to put another Glonass-M navigation satellite into orbit, a Space Forces spokesman said.

The launch has been postponed following two failed space launches in August which led to the loss of a Progress space freighter and the Express-AM4 communications satellite.

“A state commission has set the launch of a Glonass-M spacecraft on board a Soyuz-2.1B carrier rocket from the Plesetsk space center for October 1, 2011,” Col. Alexei Zolotukhin said on Thursday.

Russia lost three Glonass satellites last year when a Proton-M carrier rocket veered off course and crashed in the Pacific Ocean in December.

Glonass is Russia’s answer to the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS, and is designed for both military and civilian uses. Both systems allow users to determine their positions to within a few meters.

Russia currently has a total of 27 Glonass satellites in orbit, although only 23 of them are operational.

The complete Glonass grouping must have 24 operational and 2-3 reserve satellites for the Glonass network to operate with global coverage.